The Lance

Social Media and College Applications

Isabella Lopez, Co-Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






With the school year now in full swing, seniors at NMHS are starting to plan their futures after high school, but what a lot of students don’t realize is that colleges and jobs they apply to may be inspecting their social media accounts. The Director of Research at Kaplan Test Prep says many admissions officers believe “social media can provide a more authentic and holistic view of applicants beyond the polished applications.”

According to the Educational Consultation firm Ivywise, 27% of admissions directors Google their prospective students and 35% found something that “negatively impacted an applicant’s chances of getting in.” But if you’re thinking you’re off the hook because you didn’t post that picture from that party or tweet how great of a party it was, you might want to check again. Colleges may be turned off by posts with foul language and slurs, offensive jokes, posts talking about how awful your boss is, or even just bad spelling and grammar.

You’ve already been accepted? You still aren’t in the clear. What many students applying to college don’t know is that colleges can actually revoke your acceptance. Though it doesn’t happen often, it is not impossible. Colleges will rescind admission if a student’s final grades drop significantly, if the student faced extreme disciplinary actions by their school or arrest outside of school, and if a student lied on their application. However, actions on social media are now forcing some colleges to reevaluate who they have accepted into their school. This past year, Harvard University rescinded the admission of ten prospective students after finding offensive memes in a group chat they had made for some Harvard students. According to Forbes.com, the posts included jokes about the Holocaust, child abuse, sexual assault, and various minority groups. Punishments for offensive or insensitive jokes have brought up the topic of freedom of speech and the extent of student’s First Amendment rights, but many colleges have honor codes that students must follow and can therefore be punished for breaking.  Even though these students were not yet officially part of the school, they were expected to behave as if they were already representing the college.

However, colleges aren’t necessarily looking for negative posts. If carried out correctly, your social media may even make you more appealing. Kaplan Test Prep conducted a study which revealed that one admissions officer viewed a student’s Twitter and found that she had run her own LGBT+ panel. This was not reflected in her application, but the admissions officer felt it showed many great qualities in her. In this way, some advise students to curate their social media accounts in a way that will positively reflect who they are and what they are passionate about.

All in all, teenagers will make mistakes, but these mistakes don’t have to be broadcast online for the whole world to see because you never know who’s watching and waiting for you to make a mistake. With the newest iOS update which allows screen recording, students should be even more wary of what they post online or even text privately, especially on apps like Snapchat which would previously alert you if someone had screenshotted something of yours. Now, people can simply record your posts using the screen recording feature. It may be cliché, but the Internet really is forever.

So if you’re planning on applying to college this year, try to clean up your social media presence. Begin by Googling yourself. Start with your name. Then do your name + your high school. Then try your name + your town. What comes up? You’d be surprised how much of your life may have been reported by local newspapers with your social media attached to it or that your private social media accounts still appear in a simple Google search. Fix your privacy settings. Delete your offensive or questionable posts. Check your tagged posts and your likes. Maybe you didn’t post a questionable picture, but your best friend did. Your online presence says much more about you than your application does.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 10.0/10 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
Social Media and College Applications, 10.0 out of 10 based on 1 rating
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

The Lance welcomes all original thought. We do not have to agree with your thoughts in order for you to post a comment. We encourage you to be an active participant in our news stories. If you feel that you can add something to a story, please feel free to let your voice be heard! We reserve the right to delete any comment that we find to be offensive, threatening, or spam.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.

 

*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Social Media and College Applications

    Opinion

    When the symbol takes precedence over those it supposedly represents

  • Social Media and College Applications

    Student Life

    The College Epidemic

  • Social Media and College Applications

    Opinion

    Mental Health and the High School Student

  • Social Media and College Applications

    Opinion

    In Response To: #MeToo: Real Men Stand with Women as Allies Against Harassment

  • Social Media and College Applications

    Student Life

    Out With the Old, In With the New

  • Social Media and College Applications

    Opinion

    Hollywood’s Hypocrisy: Punishment for One, Not All

  • Social Media and College Applications

    Opinion

    The Ethics of Apple

  • Social Media and College Applications

    Special Report

    Does Your Social Media Affect Chances of Getting Accepted Into College?

  • A&E

    NMHS HypeLite

  • Social Media and College Applications

    Senior Perspectives

    Senior Perspective: Lillian Hui

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial
Skip to toolbar
The student news site of New Milford High School, New Milford, New Jersey
Social Media and College Applications